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Places to enjoy on your road trip - Sturdee Road

Sturdee Road rest area is 11km SE of Kojonup or 92km of Mt Barker , just off the highway among a few trees. Drive up Sturdee Road and experience some beautiful scenic farmland with views 

Sturdee Road.jpg

The service and sacrifice of Western Australia's Victoria Cross ( the highest award in the Australian honours system)  and George Cross recipients will be remembered in perpetuity with each recipient being commemorated at highway rest stops south of Perth.

The plaque at the Sturdee Road rest stop commemorates Corporal Ben Roberts - Smith who was a recipient of the Victoria Cross for his actions during the conflict in Afghanistan. The plaque is part of the Commemoration Way Project which honours Western Australian recipients of the Victoria Cross and George Cross.

Roberts-Smith was awarded the VC for his actions during a helicopter assault into Tizak on 11 June 2010 as part of an offensive in the Shah Wali Kot region while serving with the Special Air Service Regiment in Afghanistan. The medal, together with his Medal for Gallantry awarded during a tour of Afghanistan in 2006, made Roberts-Smith the most highly decorated member of the Australian Defence Force

Macropod - Western brush wallaby

The western brush wallaby (Macropus irma), also known as the black-gloved wallaby, is a species of wallaby found in the southwest coastal region of Western Australia. The wallaby's main threat is predation by the introduced red fox (Vulpes vulpes). The IUCN lists the western brush wallaby as Least Concern, as it remains fairly widespread and the population is believed to be stable or increasing, as a result of fox control programs.

Image Credit: Perth Zoo

Image Credit: Perth Zoo

The western brush wallaby has a grey colour with distinctive white colouring around the face, arms and legs (although it does have black gloves as its alternative common name implies). It is an unusually diurnal macropod that eats mainly grass.

Although quite small, the western brush wallaby's coloring resembles the larger kangaroos of the region. The western brush wallaby's head and body length usually falls around 1.2 m. Their tail length, which ranges from 54–97 cm, is proportionally long to their smaller body size. The adult western brush wallaby weighs anywhere from 7.0-9.0 kg. Their coloring consists of a pale to mid gray coat with a distinct white facial stripe. Other distinct features include black and white ears, black hands and feet, and crest of black hairs on the tail.[6] The size of the male and female are quite similar.

The western brush wallaby is a herbivore, although there is disagreement on whether it is a browser, eating mainly leaves, or a grazer, eating mainly grass, as there has not been extensive research done. It is a diurnal animal, which is somewhat unusual for macropods, and is active during dawn and dusk.

Like all others in the family Macropodidae, the western brush wallabies are characterized by powerful hind limbs and long hind feet. It runs by weaving or sidestepping, utilizing its powerful hind-limbs, while keeping its head low and its tail extended straight, making it very speedy.

Although decades of research have been done in regards to the reproductive behavior of the western brush wallaby, their habits are relatively unknown. The young are usually born during April and May. Females, like all marsupials, have a well-developed forwardly opening pouch containing four teats.The female gives birth to one young a time, with two rarely occurring. Gestation lasts from three to five weeks. After birth, the young enter the lactation period for seven months, until October or November. After vacating the pouch the young wallaby goes through a weaning period during which it will stick its head in the pouch temporarily attach itself to a teat.

Albany History - Wave

The Wave was a brig that was wrecked in 1848 at Cheynes Beach near Cape Riche, Western Australia.

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Built in 1838 in Victoria, Bermuda the vessel was constructed from wood and copper sheathed. It had a square stern, single deck, no galleries and a billet head. The vessel was acquired by R. Brown in 1847 and was registered in London. It was then acquired in 1848 by William Younghusband and Company of Adelaide and registered there.

The vessel was in command of James C. Coke and was transporting cargo from Adelaide to Shanghai via Albany and Singapore.[1] The brig left Adelaide 5 June 1848 loaded mostly with flour and was en route to Albany to load a shipment of sandalwood.

The vessel was anchored at Cheyne Bay near Cape Riche when it was blown ashore by a heavy gale. The Champion and Arpenteur were dispatched from King George Sound[4] to assist. The Champion managed to pull the Wave offshore but Wave was leaking badly and foundered then sunk.

Champion then salvaged some of the cargo and then transported the crew, minus the Captain, back to Albany. Captain Coke sailed to Adelaide aboard the HMS Acheron, commanded by Captain John Lort Stokes.

The owners of the Arpenteur acquired the wreck of the Wave and that cargo not already salvaged for £330. The Arpenteur sailed for Fremantle with 27 tons of flour, 1,000 bushels of wheat, the rigging and sails that the crew had salvaged from the Wave

Off the beaten track - Mount Manypeaks

Mount Manypeaks is a distinctive peak located approximately 35 kilometres (22 mi) north-east of Albany, Western Australia, 10 kilometres (6 mi) north-east of Two Peoples Bay and 6 km south-east of the town of Manypeaks.

By Hughesdarren (Own work) [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

By Hughesdarren (Own work) [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

The mountain is the dominant feature in the area and was named by Captain Matthew Flinders in January 1802 whilst surveying the south coast region in the "Investigator". Flinders noted in his journal "There are a number of small peaks upon the top of this ridge, which induced me to give it the name Mount Manypeak". The plural form has now become the accepted form of spelling.

The Mount Manypeaks formation has a total length of 22 kilometres (14 mi) and has a width of 3 kilometres (2 mi). The ridge is made up primarily of a type of graniteproterozoic porphyritic biotite granite as well as adamellite. In places limestone lies over the granite block.

The Mount Manypeaks Nature Reserve forms part of the Two Peoples Bay and Mount Manypeaks Important Bird Area, identified as such by BirdLife International because of its significance in the conservation of several rare and threatened bird species.

Farming in the northern part of the Manypeaks landscape is mixed cropping (mainly canola, wheat and barley) and sheep production with a change to cattle farming the higher rainfall areas to the south, where extensive areas of blue gum plantations have been established and there are small pockets of intensive horticulture.

Threats that affect the biodiversity of the Manypeaks landscape are many and include altered hydrology, various dieback diseases, introduced predators, inappropriate fire regimes, human recreation, historical and current clearing causing habitat fragmentation, weeds and grazing.

 

Source Wikipedia Encylopedia

Off the beaten track - Waychinicup

Waychinicup National Park is i 65 kilometres east of Albany. The park is bordered by the Southern Ocean to the south, Mount Manypeaks Nature Reserve to the east, and agricultural land to the north. Its coastline runs between Normans Beach and Cheynes Beach, near Bremer BayBald Island Nature Reserve is located offshore nearby. The park offers and array of landscapes, from the rugged coast to boulder-strewn hilltops. Tree-filled, deeply-incised valleys have freshwater streams flowing through them, with moss-covered boulders. Facilities provided include a camping area and bush toilet near the inlet of the Waychinicup River.

By Hughesdarren (Own work) [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

By Hughesdarren (Own work) [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

The park is home to some of the rarest animals in Australia. Species found in the park include quendaring tailed possums and one of the few mainland populations of quokkas.

The park forms part of the Two Peoples Bay and Mount Manypeaks Important Bird Area, identified as such by BirdLife International because of its significance in the conservation of several rare and threatened bird species.The critically endangered noisy scrubbird, which was once thought to be extinct, is found within the park; a small population of 14 were translocated from Two Peoples Bay Nature Reserve in 1983, followed by another 16 in 1985. By 1994 it was estimated that 223 male birds had been heard singing in the area

The western bristlebird is another vulnerable species that is found within the park. Most of the birds remaining population is found in Two Peoples Bay Nature Reserve and Waychinicup National Park. Populations of the bird that have been on the decline since the late 19th century has started to stabilise.

Source Wikipedia Encylopedia

Off the beaten track - Cape Riche

Cape Riche is a cape and 123 km north-east of Albany

By Geoff Derrin (Own work) [CC BY-SA 4.0 (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/4.0)], via Wikimedia Commons

By Geoff Derrin (Own work) [CC BY-SA 4.0 (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/4.0)], via Wikimedia Commons

Cape Riche was named for Claude-Antoine-Gaspard Riche, a naturalist on Bruni d'Entrecasteaux's 1791 expedition who became lost for two days near Esperance.

Matthew Flinders aboard the Investigator charted the area in 1802 as part of his circumnavigation of Australia.

George Cheyne, a Scottish immigrant, took up land at Cape Riche in 1836, after arriving in Albany in 1831. He established a trading post which was often visited by American whalers. In about 1848, sandalwoodcutters arrived in the area, The Surveyor-General of Western Australia, John Septimus Roe, visited the Cape in October 1848 as part of this 1848-49 expedition and reorganised his supplies while staying with the Cheyne family. He left 4 days later to make his way to the Russell Range.

The Cheyne properties were later taken over by the related Moir family. The Cape Riche Homestead, also known as Moirs Property, was designed and built between 1850 and 1860 by Alexander Moir. It comprises a large group of spongolite buildings.

In the 1890s the schooner Grace Darling, provided supplies and delivered the mail on its monthly run between Albany and Esperance.

Flora and fauna

A number of botanists and explorers conducted plant collections in the area in the mid-19th century including Ludwig Preiss (1840), James Drummond (1840, 1846–48) John Septimus Roe (1848) and William Henry Harvey(1854). Plant species which were formally described based on these collections included Moirs wattle (Acacia moirii), sheath cottonhead (Conostylis vaginata), tallerack (Eucalyptus pleurocarpa), autumn featherflower(Verticordia harveyi) and Bossiaea preissiiLudwig Diels and Ernst Pritzel also collected plant material at Cape Riche in 1901.

Cape Riche is home to a number of rare flora species including feather-leaved banksia (Banksia brownii), Manypeaks rush (Chordifex arbortivus), Manypeaks sundew (Drosera fimbriata) and coast featherflower (Verticordia helichrysantha). The Albany/Cape Riche area is noted as a calving area for southern right whales

Source Wikipedia Encylopedia

Off the beaten track - Pallinup River

Pallinup River is a river located in the Great Southern region of Western Australia.

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The Pallinup rises 10 km southeast of Broomehill, and flows in a southeasterly direction toward the coast passing through Kybelup Pool and discharging into the Southern Ocean via Beaufort Inlet.

The river is one of the longest rivers in the region and its tributaries flow through the towns of Borden and Gnowangerup.

The local Noongar people also know the river as the Mara River and it is regarded as a place of historical importance as the Noongar have camped, fished and traded along the banks of the river for generations.

The Pallinup River is home to many native aquatic flora and fauna. Fish found in the Pallinup River include: Galaxias maculatus (spotted minnow), Leptatherina wallacei (western/Swan River hardyhead), Pseudogobius olorum ( Swan River goby), Gambusia holbrooki(Mosquito fish), Acanthopagrus butcheri (black bream). Gambusia is the only non-native species recorded in the Pallinup River.

Some aquatic plants sampled during the Department of Environment foreshore survey include the following: Cotula coronopifolia - which is a plant with small yellow button flowers. This species is found in areas which are frequently inundated, sometimes for long periods. It is an important plant for wading birds, particularly ducks and swans. Marsilea sp. (Nardoo) is another macrophyte found in waterways. It looks like a four leaf clover, but has a long single tap root, and floats on top of the water. It grows in seasonally flooded swamps and along creeks, and is very drought tolerant, dying away in arid conditions but growing back rapidly with rains. Aborigines used sporocarps of this plant for food (Nardoo). JuncaginaceaeTriglochin sp. - commonly known as 'water ribbons' were also found in the Pallinup River. These have tuberous roots that were used by Aborigines for food. The seeds germinate readily in the autumn in shallow water and the small plants survive the winter. This plant is very important for habitat for native fish and macroinvertebrates, and as food for wading birds. The plants will survive dry conditions by putting down underground rhizomes and tubers. They will only flower when they are flooded.

The river is ephemeral and the estuary at Beaufort inlet can be closed to the sea for long period of time by a sand bar in the channel.

The water in the river is considered to be saline and explains why the river was also known as the Salt River with salinity levels varying from 3‰ when the river is flowing to over 50‰ in pools during summer.

The Pallinup has many tributaries including Warperup Creek, Six Mile Creek, Pendenup Creek, Peendebup Creek, Monjebup Creek and Corackerup Creek. No potable surface water sources are present in the Pallinup. The water quality ranges from brackish to saline. The best quality water streams exist in the Stirling Range National Park area of the catchment, which is the occasional source of snow-melt water.

Source Wikipedia Encylopedia

Places to enjoy on your road trip - Crapella

This free overnight rest area is set off the Albany Highway.  There are trees between you and the highway to provide a noise limiter.  It is a circular gravel layout with plenty of shade if desired.  It is basic with picnic tables & bins only.

Look for wildflowers - Hibbertia, Wandoo, Jarrah, Dryandra, Banksias, Eremaea, Melaleucas and Pea flowers. Follow the track around to the lake (s.e corner) which is home to small tortoises.

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The service and sacrifice of Western Australia's Victoria Cross and George Cross recipients will be remembered in perpetuity with each recipient being commemorated at highway rest stops south of Perth. 

A plaque commemorates Private Arthur Gurney who was a recipient of the Victoria Cross (V.C.) for his actions during World War Two. The plaque is part of the Commemoration Way Project which honours Western Australian recipients of the Victoria Cross and George Cross.

During fighting at Tel el Eisa on 22 July 1942, Gurney attacked three enemy machine-gun posts which had been holding up his company's advance. He had already stormed the first two, killing the occupants with his bayonet, and was approaching the third when a stick of grenades exploded, knocking him over. He continued on and charged the third post, "using the bayonet with great vigour" until killed. His body was later recovered from the post. His citation claimed that his company's successful attack "was almost entirely due to Private Gurney's heroism at the moment when it was needed".

Gurney was posthumously awarded the Victoria Cross, he also received service medals for the Second World War.

Source: Monument Australia

Places to enjoy on your road trip - Orup Creek

 Orup Creek Cathedral Of Trees Rest Area is 13.6 km Northwest of Mount Barker, WA

Orup Creek.jpg

The service and sacrifice of Western Australia's Victoria Cross and George Cross recipients will be remembered in perpetuity with each recipient being commemorated at highway rest stops south of Perth. A plaque commemorates Private Leslie Starcevich who was a recipient of the Victoria Cross (V.C.) for his actions during World War Two.

Tom Starcevich (1918-1989) was a quietly-spoken Western Australian veteran of the fighting in Egypt - he was wounded at Tel el Eisa in July 1942 - and New Guinea before gaining the Victoria Cross in North Borneo. In the capture of Beaufort he attacked Japanese machine-gun positions, fearlessly firing his Bren gun from the hip. "The outstanding gallantry of Private Starcevich in carrying out these attacks single-handed with complete disregard of his own safety resulted in the decisive success of the action."Tom Starcevich (1918-1989) was a quietly-spoken Western Australian veteran of the fighting in Egypt - he was wounded at Tel el Eisa in July 1942 - and New Guinea before gaining the Victoria Cross in North Borneo.

In the capture of Beaufort he attacked Japanese machine-gun positions, fearlessly firing his Bren gun from the hip. "The outstanding gallantry of Private Starcevich in carrying out these attacks single-handed with complete disregard of his own safety resulted in the decisive success of the action." 

Source: Monument Australia

Places to enjoy on your road trip - Crossman

Crossman is a town located in the Wheatbelt region of Western Australia, 125 kilometres (78 mi) south-southeast of the state capital, Perth along Albany Highway, and 12 kilometres (7.5 mi) east of Boddington. Close to Crossman you will find attractive reserves and rivers.

By Geoffrey Derrin (Own work) [CC BY-SA 4.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/4.0)], via Wikimedia Commons

By Geoffrey Derrin (Own work) [CC BY-SA 4.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/4.0)], via Wikimedia Commons

The name honours Lt William Crossman of the Royal Engineers, who arrived in Fremantle as a second lieutenant stationed in Perth in 1852, but was responsible for works in the Albany district and for roads in the area. In 1853, in company with surveyor A.C. Gregory, he examined and reported on various routes between Perth and Albany, and recommended that the then-current routes via York or Bunbury be replaced by a straight line between Kelmscott (now a Perth suburb near Armadale) and Albany. After serving as colonial magistrate, he returned to England in 1856 and later was promoted to captain and served as a British Member of Parliament for Portsmouth. The Crossman River, a 42 kilometres (26 mi) tributary of the Hotham River, was most likely named by A.C. Gregory in 1853.

Crossman Wildflower Reserve, a year-round sanctuary for flora and fauna and home to a wide range of native orchids,  including the rattle beaks, which only flower after fire.and Woolpack Lavender Farm, which opened in January 2003 and showcases lavender varieties.

Places to enjoy on your road trip - Gleneagle Forest

A beautiful place to take a those last remaining breaths of fresh air and enjoy a few moments of tranquility before returning to the hustle and bustle of the big smoke. 

Image Credit: Paul Torrance

Image Credit: Paul Torrance

You'll find the locality of Gleneagle on the Albany Highway nestled amongst mountains such as Eagle Hill (472m) and Mount Randall (513m) in southwest Western Australia. Gleneagle is 49km southeast of Perth (show me). Gleneagle is at an altitude of approximately 311m.

Gleneagle is located within the Jarrahdale State Forest

Gleneagle was a small forestry settlement some 26 kms south of Armadale near the junction of the Albany Highway and Jarrahdale Road. The township was abandoned in the late 1960's. At its height, Gleneagle had a school, a hall, 15 houses, teacher quarters, a forestry office, single men's huts and workshops. During the 1961 Dwellingup and Jarrahdale bushfires, the town served as a fire fighting operational centre providing necessities to all those in battle.  All the buildings were removed apart from the water tower.  The access road into old Gleneagle is around one hundred metres in length. The road splits and circles around the old townsite. The complete circuit is around one kilometre. The road was sealed but has fallen into disrepair although is still navigable.

Places to enjoy on your road trip - Williams

Williams is a town located in the Wheatbelt region of Western Australia, 161 kilometres (100 mi) south-southeast of the state capital, Perth along Albany Highway and 32 kilometres (20 mi) west of Narrogin. The Williams River passes through the town.

Shire of Williams.jpg

Williams is named after the Williams River which flows nearby. The river was discovered by Captain Thomas Bannister in 1831 while leading the first overland expedition from the Swan River Colony to King George Sound(now Albany), and was first shown on an 1833 map. More than likely, the name honours King William IV, who reigned in the United Kingdom from June 1830 until June 1837.

The first claims on land in the area occurred in 1832. In 1835 a party led by Governor James Stirling and John Septimus Roe surveyed a route joining King George Sound with York via Williams to encourage inland settlement.No settlement occurred until after Lieutenant Henry Bunbury explored the region in 1836, despite his assessment that "on the Williams the land is generally very bad and the water brackish."

After the building of Albany Highway by convicts in the 1850s, Williams became an important stopover point for passengers and changing of horses and became the main centre in the district. The Williams Hotel was erected in 1871, and a Road Board (predecessor to the current Shire Council) first convened in 1877.

In early 1898 the population of the town was 55, 30 males and 25 females. Later the same year the local Agricultural Hall was opened by Frederick Piesse, it was built at a cost of £250 granted by Parliament.

The original town had been built on the Albany side of the river, but was subject to increasing floods due to the clearing of the land for intensive farming; therefore the town was relocated to the Perth side of the bridge. The town site was surveyed in 1905 and most of the buildings in the present town site were constructed after that time.

Today the town is a centre for the wool, cattle and coarse grains industry, and serves as a stopping point on the Albany Highway. A heritage trail takes visitors past some of Williams's historic buildings and nearby wildflowerstands and dryandra forests are also attractions. One unusual feature is the Jesse Martin museum, a historic village and memorabilia collection constructed by a local farmer on his own property from old shops and post offices on the verge of being demolished in country towns, as well as barns full of old cars and farm machinery

There is an excellent Williams Heritage Trail brochure available at the Roadhouse. It details a total of 19 places of historical interest in the local area. Of these places the most interesting are the old Agricultural Hall (1898) on the Albany Highway which is now used as an Arts and Crafts shop, the superb old Williams Hotel (1871) recognised as the oldest building in town, and the very unusual convict tank, a 4 500 litre capacity underground tank which was built by ticket-of-leave men in the 1880s. The tank is located near the river on the Albany side of town.

The Heritage trail was developed by the Williams Historical Society, Williams District High School and Williams Shire Council. The trail explores early areas settlement and has two sections - a 1km walk around the townsite and a 35km scenic drive to Quindanning.

Click HERE to download brochure

 

Source:  Wikipedia