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Albany's Ship Wreck - Lady Lyttleton

Lady Lyttleton was a barque that sunk in the Emu Point Channel in Oyster Harbour. (A barque is a type of sailing ship from the age of sail and is first mentioned in the 15th century. To be classified as a barque, a ship must have a particular arrangement of masts and sails. Barques have at least three masts and square sails on all masts, except the aft, or mizzen mast, and possibly the foremast)

Barques have at least three masts and square sails on all masts  Imagae Credit: WiseGeek

Barques have at least three masts and square sails on all masts  Imagae Credit: WiseGeek

The ship was built as Sultan, with a female figurehead and a single deck. It was registered in Sydney in 1861 by the owners Alex Young and John Howard. To date endeavours to find when and where it was built have proved unsuccessful

In 1866 the vessel was sold to Harold Selwyn Smith in Melbourne and registered at the port there.

On the ship's final voyage, in the command of John McArthur it departed Adelaideon 29 May 1867 with three passengers Mrs Hogan and Mr and Mrs Carmody, and a cargo of 18 tons of bran, 10 tons of pollard, 443 tons of barley and other goods, such as tobacco, stationery, hardware, drapery, dried fruit, oatmeal. It entered King George Sound on 16 June and was leaking badly. The crew had already jettisoned part of the cargo with the rest being unloaded in Albany before it sailed to Emu Point for repairs.

Lady Lyttleton was hove down to the shore by tackles from the masthead but the ship slipped and then foundered and sank on 17 July 1867. It was later abandoned. The wreck was rediscovered by divers in 1971.The Western Australian Museum surveyed and partially excavated the site in 1978 and in 1990 with several artefacts being retrieved, including an anchor, the rudder and pintles and an extremely corroded sextant.

 

Source Wikipedia Free Encyclopdeia