Blog

Walpole Wilderness

We recently had a few free days, after a very busy end to last year and a busy start to 2017.  We packed the car and headed to the Walpole Wilderness.

Mount Frankland National Park is a national park in the Walpole Wilderness, in the South West region of Western Australia, 327 km south of Perth.  Dominated by an impressive granite peak, Mount Frankland National Park covers approximately 31000 hectares of karri, jarrah and tingle forest as well as expanses of treeless heathland.

It covers the low granite hills to the north of the town of Walpole and is covered largely by forests of karri (Eucalyptus diversicolor) and red tingle (Eucalyptus jacksonii), two of the world's largest trees. The three tingle species are unique to the area between the park and the coast and the only eucalypts to be buttressed, a feature which reflects the moist conditions prevailing within the park. On exposed areas where continuous rain washes away soil, a low heathland is the dominant vegetation.

From the top of Mount Frankland you have 360 degree views of the Walpole Wilderness. The forests, wetlands and heathlands below you are home many unique plants and animals.  Mount Frankland National Park is home to a rich array of birds, from eagles that soar high above the peak to colourful fairy wrens and robins that flit through the forest.

We followed “The Summit trail” to the towerman’s lookout on top of Mount Frankland. While the walk was strenuous, the views made it worthwhile – on a clear day you can see the Porongurup and Stirling ranges in the east and the Southern Ocean to the south.  It was pretty cloudy when we were at the top but still worth the climb.  To get there we needed to climb a ladder and over 300 steep steps.  That was a challenge for Maggie as she has a fear of heights, but bravo!! She did it.