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Caring for our wildlife is everyone's responsibility

Each year many tens of thousands of native animals are presented for care after being discovered sick, orphaned or injured by members of the community.  The primary aim of rescue and treatment of wildlife should be to rehabilitate and release the animal as quickly and effectively as possible. Animal welfare is a recognition that animals, like us, deserve a life free of pain, discomfort, distress and hunger, and one that reasonably fulfils their physiological, psychological and social needs. Animals that we rescue are often sick, debilitated or suffering from serious injuries;

Who Funds Wildlife Rehabilitation?

Everyone thinks that some agency, probably a government funded one,  protects and cares for wild animals in distress. But this is not the case.  Wildlife carers are trained volunteers who give their time and care free of charge. They pay for the care of wildlife, including VET costs from their own pocket.

Burn out for wildlife carers seems to occur all too frequently these days and it should be everyone’s responsibility to help each other and provide support and finance when we recognise that someone is struggling. 

Little Holly at Dreamers Dream Rehabilitation in Mount Barker.  She was taken into care around Christmas time in 2015.